- Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra - http://www.brightonphil.org.uk -

Gregg Isaacson (MSTAT, MMus), BPO’s Alexander Technique teacher

Gregg Isaacson02“Gregg’s keen interest in and detailed knowledge of human anatomy and musculature aids and clarifies his explanations, unfolding the complexities of the body. He has a quasi-instinctive recognition of the cause of one’s problems. One leaves with a better sense of well-being with much to think about and put into practice. He is quietly inspirational.”
Christine Messiter, Principal Flautist with The Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra

Just over three years ago a member of the Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra suggested I come along to the morning rehearsal before one of the concerts and offer some Alexander Technique sessions to the orchestra during the break. The musicians who came for a session with me said that it was a welcome relief to have some hands-on help, easing away built-up stress and tension from their bodies and minds. I came back for the next rehearsal and by the following season I was the resident Alexander Technique teacher for the orchestra!

Gregg IsaacsonWHAT IS ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE?

Alexander Technique is a practical tool that can help release pain, stress and excess tension from the body while learning how to prevent it from occurring in the future. Simple movements such as walking, bending or sitting tend to be done habitually – we don’t usually think how, we just do them. Often our habitual ways of moving cause us to make more effort than we need, gradually leading us to unnecessarily suffer wear and tear on our muscles and joints. By gently guiding us through subtle movements, an Alexander Technique teacher can give an experience of moving with greater freedom; helping us become more aware of excess tension we are carrying, and to simply let it go.

HOW DOES ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE HELP MUSICIANS?

Watching a distinguished orchestra such as the Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra perform, people may wonder how the musicians have achieved such talent; words such as patience, skill and sensitivity may come to mind. In general, people tend not to immediately think of the job of a musician as one that is physically demanding.

Playing a musical instrument requires hours of practice; often in twisted or asymmetrical positions that put the body under a significant amount of strain – and that’s before you take into consideration the weight of the instrument often being supported. Add this to the high levels of coordination, dexterity and control required in these positions, while holding their instruments, and it may become apparent why a significant proportion of professional musicians suffer from debilitating pain at some point in their careers. The Alexander Technique can help musicians sustain a lifelong career and a lifetime of enjoyment playing music by helping them learn to recognise, and thereby minimise, the effort they are making and to maintain balance, poise and composure while playing their instrument.

GREGG IS PLEASED TO OFFER A 10% DISCOUNT ON ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE LESSONS TO FRIENDS OF THE BRIGHTON PHILHARMONIC.

For more information on Alexander Technique please visit thinkinginmotion.co.uk or get in touch at gregg@thinkinginmotion.co.uk or 08754 917 202

 

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